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Montana Drug Rehab and Treatment Programs

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Drug Rehab Montana

Known as "Big Sky Country", Montana is located in the Western United States. The state's economy is largely based on agriculture ranging from ranching to cereal grain farming. Montana also profits from oil, coal, hard rock mining, lumber and more recently tourism. National parks are a prime tourist attraction including Glacier National Park, Bighorn Battlefield National Monument and Yellowstone National Park. The United States Census Bureau estimated Montana's population at 1,023,579 residents as of July 2014. The state's population has increased since the 2010 United States Census by 3.45 percent.

Similar to other states in the Western part of the United States, Montana has seen an increase in meth abuse and addiction cases over the past decade. It is also seeing a rise in cocaine addiction cases due to wholesale amounts of the drug being smuggled into the state. While law enforcement has successfully curbed a great deal of illegal drug abuse, production and distribution - drug addiction continues to be a problem in Montana. A majority of the illegal drugs brought into Montana are smuggled in from other states by Mexican drug trafficking organizations. Controlling much of the Northwest and Colorado, these Mexican drug trafficking organizations are responsible for the increase in illicit substance abuse and addiction cases throughout Montana.

During 2012, an estimated 8,787 residents enrolled in Montana drug and alcohol rehab programs. Of these enrollments, 69.6 percent were male and 30.4 percent were female. The largest age group to receive drug rehabilitation treatment in Montana during 2012 was between the ages of 26-30 years old (16.8 percent). The second largest age group of residents to enroll in Montana drug rehab programs during 2012 was between the ages of 21-25 years old (16.4 percent). Alcohol addiction with a secondary substance was the top reason for residents to seek drug and alcohol rehab services in Montana during 2012. The second largest group seeking drug and alcohol rehabilitation in Montana during 2012 cited alcohol addiction as their reason for getting treatment. Following alcohol addiction was marijuana addiction, other opiates addiction and amphetamines (meth).

Alcohol addiction with a secondary substance was the top reason residents sought treatment in Montana drug and alcohol rehab programs during 2012. An estimated 2,760 residents enrolled in Montana drug and alcohol treatment programs during 2012 for alcohol addiction with a secondary substance, making up 31.4 percent of all the drug and alcohol rehab admissions in the state that year. 75 percent of these enrollments were male and 25 percent were female. The largest age group to receive rehabilitation in Montana for alcohol addiction with a secondary substance was between the ages of 26-30 years old (16 percent). The second largest age group was between 21-25 years old (15.9 percent) and 31-35 years old (15.9 percent).

Alcohol addiction with a secondary substance is also known as poly drug addiction; the individual is dependent on alcohol as well as another substance. Many who are addicted to alcohol and a secondary substance will require medical detox to safely withdraw from the substances they are dependent on. After medical detox, enrolling in one of Montana's long-term inpatient or residential treatment programs is the next step in recovery. To be addicted to multiple substances usually requires intensive drug rehabilitation that is long-term and inpatient or residential. These more thorough types of programs work with the individual on a long-term basis and provide care 24/7 to ensure their client's safety and comfort.

The most widely abused illegal drug in Montana is marijuana. A majority of the marijuana in Montana is smuggled in through Mexico and brought into the state. Some areas of the state have access to higher grade marijuana from Canada as well. A recent survey conducted in the state revealed that nearly half of Montana's high school population has experimented with marijuana at some point in their lives. This experimentation continues into their adult years, and for many becomes a lifelong habit.

During 2012, an estimated 1,560 residents enrolled in Montana drug rehab programs for marijuana addiction. Of these enrollments, 78.9 percent were male and 21.1 percent were female. The largest age group to receive marijuana addiction treatment in Montana during 2012 was between the ages of 12-17 years old (23 percent). The second largest age group in Montana to enroll in drug rehab for marijuana addiction during 2012 was between the ages of 21-25 years old (19.2 percent).

The need for effective marijuana addiction treatment in Montana has created numerous drug rehab programs to help the state's residents. Addiction to marijuana can be addressed in a number of different types of rehab settings including: inpatient, outpatient, residential, medical and alternative treatment programs. The right type of treatment approach is dependent on the individual's specific addiction problem. Residents who have a brief history of marijuana abuse and addiction may find that outpatient or short-term programs provide the support and guidance they need to get back on track and stop abusing marijuana. Those who have a lengthy history of marijuana addiction or past experiences in drug rehab programs will find that a more intensive long-term approach to recovery is necessary to help them truly conquer their addiction problem.

The next largest group entering Montana drug rehab programs during 2012 for substance abuse problems cited other opiates as their reason for receiving treatment. This category includes admissions for non-prescription use of methadone, codeine, morphine, oxycodone, hydromorphone, meperidine, opium, and other drugs with morphine-like effects. The most widely abused prescription drugs in Montana are OxyContin, Xanax, Vicodin and Valium. Residents obtain their prescription drugs through a number of sources including dishonest physicians, personal theft, pharmacy robberies, abusing legitimate prescriptions and unregulated Internet sales of prescription medications.

During 2012, an estimated 981 residents enrolled in Montana drug rehab programs for other opiates addiction problems. This made up 11.2 percent of all the drug rehab enrollments during that year in the state. The male to female ratio was almost equal; with 50.5 percent of those in treatment for other opiates addiction being male and 49.5 percent being female. The largest age group to enroll in Montana drug rehabs during 2012 for other opiates was between the ages of 26-30 years old (24.1 percent). The state has a number of highly successful drug rehabilitation programs to help residents overcome their prescription drug addiction problems. By taking into consideration the prescription medication that is abused and the severity of the addiction, an addiction treatment professional can match the resident to the appropriate type of treatment program in the state.

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Montana Drug Statistics

1. In the state of Montana, there is an estimate by the federal government of 43,000 residents abusing painkillers in the last year, according to the NSDUH study of 2005 and 2006.

2. In Montana, there are between 43,000 and 51,000 prescription drug abusers and they account for 4% to 5% of the state's population.

3. Every year, the abuse of prescription narcotics, in Montana, leads to more than 300 Montanans, making prescription narcotic abuse fifteen times more deadly than Cocaine, Meth and Heroin combined.

4. In Missoula, Montana, the Department of Justice's Forensic Science Division reported a 5. 4% increase in prescription narcotic related deaths between 2008 and 2009.

5. The Montana Board of Crime Control reported 230 arrest for illegal possession of prescription narcotics in 2009.

6. In Montana, there were 602 hospital admissions related to prescription narcotic abuse in 2009, with total charges of around $4. 5 million.

Drug Facts
  • In 2004 there were around 627,000 visits to emergency rooms involving prescription drugs in the U.S.
  • Individuals who use opiates such as morphine, hydromorphone, or oxycodone typically feel the onset of withdrawal symptoms within six to 12 hours of the last dose.
  • Out of 205,407 drug-related emergency room visits made by people in search of detox or substance abuse treatment services in 2009, almost three quarters (69.2%) involved multiple drugs.
  • For opiate addicted individuals, the beginning of treatment is detoxification which is a controlled and medically supervised withdrawal from opiates. Detox by itself is not treatment, because most addicts will eventually resume taking the drug unless they get further help.